Welcome to the second installment of the QuestionPro Community Insights Tool Newsletter. I like to share the Newsletters to keep you updated about what’s happening at QuestionPro Community Insights Tool. It ranges from links to the latest blogs, info on product updates, new features highlights, features you should be using, webinars coming up, etc. My goal is to keep you in the know on all the important information.

There are several crowd sourcing tools out there.  But a recent case study shows that IdeaScale’s iPhone App has outperformed the others.
OpenMaps is a feature rich app that creates and edits open map data.  The folks at OpenMaps wanted to get feedback from their audience and decided that mobile apps would be a great way to do it….

I’m not sure how radical an idea this is, but I’m going to propose an interesting marketing and marketing research strategy that will generate testimonials, promote your product and it’s features and benefits AND give you some interesting feedback.
VIDEO IS HOT HOT HOT for 2011
According to a Nielsen report put out by Cisco, by 2013, 90% of allweb traffic will be video!…

It’s the last quarter of 2010 and for those of you that are getting ready to plan for 2011, you’ll be heartened to know that we’ll be featuring timely content so that you can start planning for 2011.
You can count on social media being a component of your marketing mix.  While you may not have much of an investment in dollars traded for service, you can expect to invest time.  …

The Vistage Confidence Index evolved from a “customer survey” to the largest survey of chief executives from small and medium sized businesses in the U.S.  Over 2,500 small business CEOs answer the same set of 9 questions based on the economy and another 5-7 questions relating to current economic issues.  All of the respondents are members of Vistage International….

Industrial buyers are people too!
I used to go crazy working in a manufacturing environment and hearing sales people or executives go on and on about how “our customers” were different.  They were “industrial buyers”.  They were part of a buying center or committee — as if they had no pulse or something.  (Well, that part was true for some of them)….